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What is tapping or Emotional Freedom Technique?

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Evidenced based therapy, Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) is often called ‘tapping’ or ‘psychological acupuncture’. Studied by Bond University in Queensland its brief technique combines elements of exposure and cognitive therapy, and somatic stimulation and uses a two finger tapping process with a cognitive statement. 

EFT has been researched in more than ten countries, by more than sixty investigators, whose results have been published in more than twenty different peer-reviewed journals (over 100 publications). 

•The EFT Mini Manual is available free here.

The Standard EFT Process

Usually there is something you want to change, and you rate your level of distress or discomfort around this out of ten (10 = most distress, 0 = no distress). You then state a negative thought or feeling you have (associated with a specific emotional event), and pair this with a self-acceptance statement. “Even though I am worried about this test, I accept this about myself”.  As you say this setup statement, you tap on the side of one hand (see fig. 1 below) saying the setup statement three times. You then tap through all eight Clinical EFT points while saying a short reminder phrase, which is usually the main feeling or body sensation, or thought (e.g. this fear). You then take a breath and re-rate your distress out of 10. Tap again from the eyebrow point through all points, until your rating is 0. (You only need to start again with the setup statement if you want to change the topic you are tapping on.)

eft tapping pointsSet up – side of hand (near little finger)

  1. Eyebrow
  2. Outer Eye
  3. Under Eye
  4. Below Nose
  5. Above the Chin
  6. Collarbone
  7. Below the Armpit
  8. Top of head

Tapping on spot several times and state your issue (although I feel _____ I still accept/like/love myself. Tapping until emotional issue is reduced.

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"Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgement that something else is more important than fear."
James Neil Hollingworth

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